Learning

Helping just because we can…Hana Lee’s Story!

From Angela & JUNE MEDICAL… 

16 year old student Hana Lee met JUNE MEDICAL Managing Director Angela Spang on the 11th July 2017, when Angela was delivering a talk at Hana’s School in Amersham.  Hana got in touch with Angela after hearing her speak at Amersham school with an interest in the Apprenticeships that JUNE MEDICAL had to offer.

As Hana planned to go back to school to study for her A-levels it was decided that an apprenticeship wasn’t for her at this time, however JUNE MEDICAL who are always happy to help and encourage new talent, offered Hana some work experience over her summer holiday period.

Hana carried out some key market research for our sister company LMEDAC, which will help determine the next direction for the business to take.  Hence Hana was instrumental in some extremely valuable work and proved a worthwhile contribution to the company in the weeks that she worked with us.

Hana fitted straight in within our team environment, she had her head down working hard but also joined in with office discussions, team meetings and brainstorm sessions – she even took the initiative to clean the office without anyone asking her.

Hana’s time with the JUNE MEDICAL team proved to be mutually beneficial and she was a pleasure to have onboard.  This is another fine example of Angela Spang and her team giving back and developing future prospects. 

After only a couple of days into Hana’s work experience she expressed the wish to continue working with us.  This is something we hope we can make happen for her.  Angela and her team wish Hana the very best of luck with her future career development. 

From Hana’s Perspective…

Why did you want to come and work with us: I attended my schools induction day and Angela was there giving a talk which was mainly about body language and how people acted/reacted in certain situations.  I knew I wanted to do some sort of work experience during the summer but at the time I hadn’t found anything.

After hearing Angela talk about the apprenticeships her company ran, I took the opportunity to get her email address at the end of the session to see if I would be able to get some work experience with her.

Since both June Medical and London Medical Education Academy (LMEDAC) deal in the medical industry, I found that this would be the perfect work experience to ‘get my foot in the door’ and gain experience in the general field of the industry I am currently planning to work in.

Why would you like to continue working with us?: I would love to continue to broaden my current knowledge further with both June Medical and London Medical Education Academy.  In the summer I learnt things I had no prior knowledge of and the work continued to interest me.

I didn’t have a dull day especially as everyone in the office was so kind and friendly

What have you learnt so far?: I learnt a lot about medical procedures in a range of different specialities due to the market research I did and I gained a new insight into the use of cadavers for medical training.  Also, thanks to Liz (Thornber) of LMEDAC, I was also given a quick overview at the marketing side of the company and how to use SalesForce and MailChimp.  I came to the realisation as to how important social media is to a constantly growing business.

What are you ambitions for the future?: Currently, I want to study Psychology at University but before that I am planning to take a gap year to travel and volunteer or work – I know I won’t have the time to do this otherwise.

Long term, at the moment I feel I would like to be a Psychologist or a Psychiatrist.

Keeping In Touch…

True to our word, the team at JUNE MEDICAL and LMEDAC have kept in touch with Hana and we are following her progress with genuine interest.  After a recent follow up we were delighted to hear of how Hana’s time with us has made an impact on her ability moving forwards…

How did you do in your GCSE exams?:  got two 8’s, one 7, four A’s, two B’s and one C whilst at the Amersham School.

Has working with us over the summer changed anything for you going back to school?: The work I did has helped me prepare for my A-Levels as I learned how to become more independent in my research.  This has definitely been helping me so far as additional research into my subjects has been a lot easier than it would have been, had I not had the chance to work with you.

Are you hoping to come back and spend any more time with us?: I would love the opportunity to come back and work again!  At the moment I’m focusing on my new school Dr Challoner’s High School and A-Level courses, but if I got the chance in the future I would definitely accept.

Were you inspired by working with us and has it helped you in anyway?: Working with June Medical and the London Medical Education Academy has really helped me to decide to carry on doing my A-Level subjects and it will definitely help me in the future as it’s helped me focus on what I really enjoy and want to do.

Would you recommend work experience to fellow students and why?: This work experience was an amazing opportunity and I would definitely recommend it to fellow students, especially those at my school as many are aspiring to work in the medical field in the future.

Any advice that you can offer following your experience with us?: The opportunity was great!  I fully expected to be doing filing and the ‘coffee & tea runs’, but you got me straight into researching.  I don’t have any advice to offer as the experience went beyond what I envisaged.

GUEST BLOG: Ali Arif

When Angela had messaged me asking if I could write an article for her blog, I took the opportunity and was immensely excited.  The experience of her teaching is something I can write about for hours and hours.

Angela came to my school to teach us about the art of body language:

How it can promote leadership, learning, development, entrepreneurship and growth. From the first time I spoke to her, I knew that me and her would get along because she did the best thing possible, which was offering me crisps. Continue reading…

Two new people to help find their strengths!! Who’s excited!?!

Me!

In september, we have a new apprentice start, on a rotation program between 3 of my companies. She is in for a treat very different to most apprenticeships: she originally didn’t want to do one, because she was afraid she would be filing and making tea for a year.

Not with us. Here, you learn.

When Ifsa (our first apprentice) started, we gave her responsibility for the entire Continue reading…

Why I love LMEDAC (even though most people can’t say it)

When doctors learn a new procedure or product, they train on plastic or computer simulators, and/or actual live patients (who often don’t realize it). This causes unnecessary harm and suffering, and surgical errors cost the NHS billions.

This of course wasn’t a problem when few innovations came through, but today it has doubled from just 5 years ago. Patients are injured and even killed, because learning curves aren’t completed before going into live surgery (including children).

We train doctors to be better surgeons, by providing donated cadaveric tissue instead of training on live patients.

Our company’s potential is enormous, but our topic is emotional and sensitive. Guidance end expert advise will give us a higher chance of getting this right, and if we do, we will all benefit: for every surgeon we train, the improved outcomes impacts every patient they will ever operate on.

Our work is threefold:

Policy – to change guidelines

Funding – to give doctors the funds and time off to train

Availability – increase awareness of cadaver donations (as opposed to just organ donation, which most have heard of).

For us, our work really DO make a difference between life and death. We are passionate about our vision, and hope you will be too.

(and it is pronounced [ell-med-ack] )

(and you can read more about LMEDAC here)

(and you can donate your body here)

Why leaders with egos are bad for business

Here is what a leader with a big ego will do:

  1. Being defensive. (Early sign: Defending ideas. Ultimately turns into becoming defensive.)
  2. Comparing to others. If you continually compare yourself to others, you will actually become less competitive. Too inward focusing!
  3. Seeking  acceptance to justify your ego needs. You crave respect and recognition from others, which eventually interferes with your success.
  4. Show off: You make a point of showcasing your brilliance.
  5. You think you have all the answers.
  6. Reject advice. Not smart.
  7. Can’t admit to being wrong. Ever pushed an idea through, even though you had that sinking feeling in your gut? Cut your loss and regroup instead. Only weak leaders have a hard time doing this.

None of this will make your business stronger, bigger or healthier, and none if this will foster good leaders around you.

Got a big ego? I suggest you send it on holiday for a few weeks and see how you get on without it. You just may be surprised.

I’ve yet to meet anyone complaining someone’s ego is too small.

“What’s your strength?”

I asked….and they didn’t know. I was a bit saddened by that. They looked so lost.

I asked them what their strength was; 29 out of 58 wasn’t able to write down anything on the paper in front of them. Just a sad face in the space where their strength was supposed to be.

A room full of young people, 85% had already told me they didn’t know what they wanted to do, or be, or dream of. A few were clear: focused goals and a plan of how to get there….but the majority looked like deer in headlight; “Oh no, will this be another grown-up telling me what I should do..?”

So I told them. Loud and clear, I let them know that I wasn’t going to tell them a single thing about what to do with their lives. A few looked like they were thinking I wasn’t being very helpful. That may very well be true. But I wanted to give them a bigger gift than that.

I wanted to give them a tool to figure it out for themselves.

So we spent an hour together, talking about two major things:

  1. Body language. How to figure out what someone is saying when they are not using just their words. And, perhaps more importantly, how to communicate back and forth on that level.
  2. Strengths. Not weaknesses. Not fixing “what you have to be better at”. I told them to stop wasting their time, because trying to fix your weaknesses is fighting nature. Make sure your weaknesses isn’t putting barriers up for you, but don’t strive to be better than someone else in an area of weakness. Focus on your strengths: Find them, hone them, practice them.

Show off your strengths. Wear them like a badge of honour, a crown on your head, a halo of skill leading your way.

And then we talked about how. And we practiced, because if you don’t know what your skill IS, how are you going to know how to do all that?

More about that later. Sign up to get a notice when I spend time to develop that part of the conversation.

Open plan office pitfalls?!

I like open plan offices, as it encourages communication. But does it work as well as we think?

Think about average number of distractions during an average work day…..Now take that number and multiply it by 23.

That’s how many minutes of concentration you actually lose. You see, it takes an average of 23 minutes and 15 seconds to return to the original task after an interruption, according to Gloria Mark, who studies digital distraction.

Distractions side track you for up to a half hour!

In other words, that “30 seconds to check Twitter” isn’t just 30 seconds down the drain. It’s 23 minutes and 45 seconds. (very few of the twitter posts I read are worth that kind of investment, but perhaps I am just following the wrong people… !)

And all these distractions not only hurt effectiveness, they make us stressed, grumpy and less sharp: “Our research has shown that attention distraction can lead to higher stress, a bad mood and lower productivity,” Mark wrote.

Are we victims or villains?!

 

Interestingly enough, half the interruptions were self-inflicted. Working on a task and switching tabs to check Facebook, for example, is a self-inflicted interruption. As opposed to, say, a coworker walking over to discuss a project.

We are, essentially, playing tennis with our cognitive energies, volleying them back and forth at a moment’s notice. Only unlike a tennis ball, our brain takes a little time to switch directions. More like a really large ferry…!

And the problem isn’t just the time wasted. We’re sacrificing some of our best thinking: if you keep jumping between different topics and thoughts, how deep can you really get into a subject?!

Does this resonate with you? It does with me. I just don’t know what to do about it yet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tough times hit hard: 5 things that may help.

Brexit, economic downturn, lack of funding, new regulations and changing personal circumstances  are all events that can rock the foundation of your startup business. Making it through hard times requires a steel determination and some serious grit. However, these days I think we need more than just fighting spirit. Here are some thoughts on what else to do when tough times hit.

Cut Carefully

I really don’t like this cutting, because I think one should always be frugal with money. In addition, for small and growing business, cost-cutting needs to be implemented with the precision of a surgeon’s scalpel. Cut too deep and your business will never recover. Cut too shallow and cash flow problems could force you to the back of the unemployment line. Exercise care and judgment in determining what and where to cut and by how much. And keep monitoring the impact.

Use Low-Budget Marketing

When recessions and other difficult times hit, the marketing function of a business is the first to get cut. With less advertising and marketing, the funnel of incoming prospects is reduced creating even more revenue decreases and setting up a vicious cycle.

The key to salvage any business in hard times is NOT to reduce your marketing activities but to REPLACE them with  Low-budget marketing ( include tactics such as PR, networking, public speaking, online marketing and more.) If you’re already doing that, then figure out how you can do more, through new channels.

Invest your way out?

Are there others feeling the pinch? Can you buy yourself some growth, with efficiencies to be made through scaling operations?

Customer. Customer. Customer.

In good times, business comes easy. Your sales pitch or marketing message may be less effective but will still get results. Surviving hard times requires going back full circle to the fundamentals: Keep it simple, and give your customers what they want and need. Make sure EVERY customer is happy, because you certainly can’t afford a single unhappy one.

Forwards!!

It’s easy to fall into the trap of replaying the situation that got you here today. If you had a failed partnership, replaying your mistakes is a mistake. Research published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology by Lyubomirsky, Sousa, et al reveals analysis occurring during talking or writing is beneficial in difficult times while replaying negative events is detrimental.

There is a great book called “What got your here won’t get you there”, and that phrase is a great reminder of the need to pause, take stock, realign and move forward.
Go win. If it was EASY, ANYBODY could’ve done it already.

It isn’t personal. I just want BETTER.

The team around me is used to my objective, non biased, unemotional drive for constant improvement, but I was reminded today that not everyone can handle that kind of feedback.

We have to untrain people as they join us. Here you don’t get criticised. Here, we all just strive for better.

I say what I mean.

When I say “the outcome was poor”, I mean exactly that. It means we can improve, do something better, and that we have learned a lesson. Nothing else.

I remember the days when I worked in a different team, and a comment like that was an attack on the team or the individual. It is so easy to forget that most people still work in that type of environment. (I remember how exhausting it was.)

It isn’t feedback.

I take time to give feedback. I think, digest, review, challenge and form constructive feedback aimed at increasing confidence while improving performance (or perception, but that’s for another day. Remind me I should talk about that too.). I don’t lash out on emotional detours in the middle of a working day. But of course, today, that’s how my comment was perceived, and I need to fix that. I certainly cannot put the responsibility of knowing me and understanding how I communicate on the recipient. That would be hugely unfair.

It isn’t personal.

Just a little bit…in the GOOD way. I consider my team members partners, and we work together, side by side. In my view, we have the same goal, and we work equally hard to get there. I am much more focused on the end goal, and I have no time for internal competition. So when I push for better output, it is me objectively pushing for improvement. from ALL of us, including me.

And I will never stop. Sorry 🙂

GUEST BLOG: UK Ice Skating Champion Louise Walden-Edwards

I’ve recently had the pleasure of connecting with world class professional athlete Louise Walden, and convinced her to write about her approach to learning, a key aspect that we both view as central to success. Here is her story.

Louise Walden and Owen Edwards

“My View Of Learning…

My view on learning now differs dramatically to what I once thought it was as a child. As an active, easily distracted child, who was once described by a teacher as ‘no better than average’, learning for me was obligatory hours spent at school. I probably would have told you that learning was boring, inconvenient and dull.  As I reflect now, I question whether my view was the innocence of youth or in actual fact something that I had learnt in itself.

Now as former British Champion, Team GB member, World Class professional athlete and International Gold Medallist, who has built her career on constantly exceeding expectations, I can deduce a completely different perspective to that of my younger self. Learning for me is a fundamental aspect of life.  The knowledge that we gain from learning and the way in which we use it, is how we allow ourselves to evolve, develop and be our own success.

As a child I associated learning with education and without choice, which back then I suppose it was to some extent, but my perception was also that anything outside of academia or anything a little bit creative, was merely playtime.  Where that view point came from I am unsure of, but that highlights to me that as teachers, parents and role models, we have a responsibility to be aware of how we inadvertently influence those around us.

I now find learning is exciting, necessary and valuable.

It is a privilege, it is precious and an investment in ones future.  Without learning we cannot grow, progress or succeed and it is imperative for limitless self improvement.  How you choose to learn, who you choose to learn from, the knowledge you gain from those experiences and then how you use it, is what makes us all unique.

 

My adult self now appreciates that learning does not need to be attributed to education, teachers or text books.

I am constantly learning from every person that I meet and every experience that I find myself in.  I believe that without learning from both negative and positive experiences, failings and victories, pessimists and optimists, we may never reach our full potential.

I expect I will always be selective with who I allow to demonstrate leadership and inspire me.  The ability to lead and to teach I’m my opinion, is giving the gift of knowledge to others and something I feel very protective of, as knowledge in the wrong hands may not always be productive.  Leaders and motivators therefore have a responsibility to allow people to be themselves, to encourage freedom of expression and interpretation of knowledge, so that a person may create their own path.

Perhaps the most valuable lesson I learnt as a child did in fact originate from my school days and from that very teacher who thought I wouldn’t amount to much.

I learnt from him I needed to strive to overachieve in every aspect of my life.

I have lived in fear of that word ‘average’ and made sure that everything I do is to the best of my ability.

I live by the belief that the sky is the limit and that if you dream, believe, work and focus relentlessly on what you want to achieve, you can and you will achieve it.”

Louise Walden-Edwards

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