Category Archives: Entrepreneur

Does it look good?

I run three companies, I work part time, I chair a charity for the local school, and have an amazing family whom I love, and who love me in return. I live in a big house in the center of an affluent town, and we have just had our downstairs refurbished with the help of an interior decorator.  I would guess that on the surface, it all looks pretty enviable.

And don’t get me wrong — I know very well how lucky I am. Not a day  goes by without me talking to my kids about being grateful, humble and generous.

My point with this is that not everything is as it seems.

Being a leader is lonely, but I don’t complain. I chose this. Being busy? Same thing. I made that choice too.

But I would give it all up in a heart beat, if I could cure my dad.  He is a cancer sufferer, since ten years back. He is battling this cruel, unforgiving, crippling torture that we call cancer, and he does it with strength, integrity, determination and power. But of course, we know how it ends. We are close, my dad and I, very close, and this breaks my heart.  You may have heard my comment on the radio last week, where I shared how my parents have been enablers for my dreams — this is true in so many ways. That’s how he got into horses 🙂

I don’t talk about this often, but I wanted to mention it in case this life looks easy. In many ways it is, but in the ways that matter the most (love and family), it isn’t easy at all.

 

 

Sometimes I surprise myself: Work Ethics

I was chatty. I don’t know how that fits with being an introvert, because I am told they aren’t chatty. But on the radio yesterday (1.5h!) I was happily chatting. Perhaps because it was mostly about business and people around me, both being topics of interest to me.

Lately, I am getting a lot of invitations to speak and write. I am absolutely delighted, as it means I have something worth listening to, and if that can help and/or inspire someone, that’s great.

Sometimes I say things that I didn’t know I was thinking. For example, I don’t think I realised how much work ethic my parents have instilled in me. Perhaps that is both a strength and a weakness?

Strength, because it is natural to me, and I always do my very best, and I work hard. I am committed, and dedicated. You can trust me with getting it done.

Weakness, because when I was younger, I would get it done at any cost. I think I may have frequently bulldozed over people if they weren’t on board. (Sorry about that.)

Potentially also a weakness, because what I take for granted may not be natural to others. Am I expecting too much from my team?

I don’t have any answers – this is another area where I am still learning.

And….is there anyone out there who thinks they DON’T have great work ethics? Maybe we all think we do, and we are just fooling ourselves?

 

 

 

Nobody* likes to feel naked in public

The professor in the back of the room is leaning back in her chair, arms crossed. She is tilting her head, eyes narrowing. I know I am in for a challenge, I can see it. The tension in the room is palpable.

I am 26 years old, and have been in the job for a couple of months. I represent a medical device company, and my customers and doctors, highly educated, are experts in their field. Decisions are made on facts, statistics and clinical data.

The professor asks me if I think the product I am talking about has better clinical trial results that the leading product on the market. 6 months ago I had never read a clinical trial. She is the lead author for over 250 publications in major journal across the world. There is only one thing to do: openly say that I don’t know.

This is a frequent occasion in my business, and rightly so. Medical device reps is on high turnover, often young, inexperienced, polished and smart, in for the career opportunities. In the good cases, there to make a difference, in the bad cases they are there to make a quick sale and move on.

Two things are imperative to do a good job in one of my companies;

Technical skills, and a humble approach to the knowledge of our customers. There is no way we can catch up with the 8 years of medical school. But we CAN be experts on one thing: our product.

I tell my team 2 things: don’t EVER try to diagnose and treat a patient. You will be asked to, and sometimes even pushed to. Stay away, and do not be flattered and dragged in, no matter how good your relationship with the doctor is. You are NOT trained and equipped to make such judgement.

Know everything there is to know about the product. Features, benefits, technical specs, clinical data, user experience, manufacturing process, origin, improvement history. Watch it being used. Listen, learn. Ask questions  of the users. My favourite one: Ask the user why she/he is using it. They will tell you better reasons than your marketing department can, with a lot more credibility. Know how it is used, in what applications. For us, anatomy is key, and I send my team on the same anatomy trainings that doctors attend. They need ton be extremely knowledgeable, so they can add value to the customer.

After all, it boils down to this: you need to earn the trust of your customer, and they will appreciate your dedicated. Few things can replace passion and dedication, no matter what field you’re in. And trust me…you can’t fake that.

And of my professor? I asked her to mentor me. We spent a couple of years with me tagging along every chance I got. Her patience and support benefits me yet to this day, and I thank her by paying it forward.

*Well, MOST people don’t like it.

 

Beware. Frustrated Entrepreneur.

….you KNOW IT WILL GET UGLY.

We work hard. I have hired the best I could find, and I have coached and refined their skills. They are like racehorses: competitive, well trained, prepared and with a winning attitude. They are GOOD. We run circles around most competitors, thanks to the internal dedication and alignment.

So you can imagine how VERY frustrating it is to me when we have to collaborate with companies who don’t have that kind of ethos. Companies who don’t focus on their staff, which means the staff don’t focus on their employer. While my gang would go through fire for our company and our colleagues, we sometimes run into companies who….just don’t. And boy do we get pissed off. We raise hell on earth. Rarely makes a difference though.

Reasons:
–If we promised a customer something, we WILL get it to them… on time.
–We try our VERY best, always. You better do the same if you want to supply us.
–Our CUSTOMER FOCUS is relentless. Yours should be too.

Doesn’t that sound simple!?

So why isn’t that the primary objective of EVERY organisation?!

5 things you can do for your team TODAY

1) Make sure you can hire the best talent, so make sure they have FLEXIBLE WORKING HOURS and that they can WORK PART TIME.
2) If you can, pay them BEFORE CHRISTMAS.
3) Give them their BIRTHDAY OFF, as a present.
4) Take every chance to BUILD UP INTERNAL RESPECT for individuals and roles in the company.
5) Hand over ownership to areas, topics or projects. Build leaders.

Do one of these, or which ever one you can. You will be repaid in multiples.

My second application was rejected too! WTF.

So I have now submitted two rounds of the same applications for funding from Horizon 2020 to prove how surgical confidence has an impact on outcome.

Both got rejected.

And interestingly enough, the SECOND application was deemed WORSE than the first one!!

The rating was much worse specifically in the area of proving the market potential for the final product despite me adding further detail and markets. I believe (from the notes in the feedback) that they simply thought the numbers are too good, versus what I was asking for. And that, exactly that, is an entrepreneurs weakness. You see, we are consistently asking for less money than others, if my theory is true.

Entrepreneurs ask for less money because we are used to doing more with less.

When Shaking The Rabbit is The Only Rescue

“He is shaking the rabbit.” (About Mr Hammond from my live comments on Autumn Statement)

As I was Live Blogging (stressful for a Swedish native btw) for Enterprise Nation commenting on the Autumn Statement earlier this week, I pointed out that Mr Hammond was “Shaking the rabbit”.

It is safe to say that none of the suggestions on my twitter feed following that was a correct description, hence this clarification. (This happens frequently for those who have the unfortunate of working with me on a regular basis).

I regularly use Swedish expressions to explain myself, with limited success of translating them into an English equivalent.

Shaking the Rabbit

Let’s say that you have a 3 hour presentation to Senior Management. You and your team have worked hard on your presentation, and it is as solid as it can get, with one or two exceptions where there just isn’t as robust and solid info as you would like, or an area of contention between board members.

That’s when you shake the rabbit.

Image result for bunny on in a car

By creating a focus area somewhere else that attracts everyone’s attention, you increase your chances of getting through your presentation while maintaining focus on the parts that you would want to emphasise. There are of course many clever ways to do this.

Next time you review someone else’s presentation, see if they have one. If so, chose if you want to call it out, or if you just want to use it as a landmark….what was it taking the focus OFF?